No subject


Tue Nov 9 01:00:01 PST 2010


One part of the cluster would act as a dictionary,
one part would act as a grammar/comprehension manager, for the original as well as
the translated text,
one part would act as a "contextuator", a process remaining largely TBD
one part would act as supervisor (having AI capabilities & learning procedures
etc.)

We have now defined a 4 part set of algorithms, all of which, I'm sure, can
benefit from process migration.

Recently, a friend of mine tested a translation software (a very good one by
today's standards) between English & French. The sentence "Germanium is a good
semi conductor" came out as "L'allemand est un mauvais chef d'orchestre"... as I
said, its all in the context.

Cheers, Al


       "jok707s at mail.smsu.edu" a écrit :

> Let me throw some more fuel on the fire for the translation discussion:
>
> Suppose one had a large, complex web site that was also constantly changing.
> Furthermore, suppose one wanted this entire site to be always available online
> in a large number of different languages.  Could the ongoing process of site
> translation be parallelized by target language &/or page?  My offhand guess
> would be that splitting up the process for different languages could be
> embarassingly parallel, but doing it by page might be more complex due to
> links.
>
> Besides the translation process per se, what issues would be involved in the
> relationship between the translating hardware/software and the web server that
> would be keeping the whole thing online in a state as close to real-time as
> possible?  Is anyone using beowulf(s) for something like this already?
>
> Perhaps a country like India is already wrestling with something like this.
> If I recall correctly, India has somewhere around fourteen official languages,
> several hundred unofficial ones, and more dialects than anyone has ever tried
> to count (somebody with the facts can correct my numbers)--and this is even
> before you cross the border and try to reach the rest of the world.  If
> Internet access reaches the rural corners of India faster than the people out
> there learn English, intense parallel translation could be very handy.
>
> Any interested parties who have not yet seen www.tranexp.com might want to
> check out the InterTran software; this could give you a better idea of both
> the possibilities and the problems involved here.
>
> Joel
>
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